New year, new direction

Dobby

Master has given Ducky a sock.

Rather than wait for a specific date to roll around, I’ve found that just getting started on making a change when the inspiration hits is more effective and longer lasting. I’ve made them before, but they didn’t stick; as usual.

This year however, I’m being laid off.

Why is this happening?

Simple. The company is reorganizing. My position, and the positions of everyone else on my team here in Seattle, are being moved to the company’s headquarters on the other side of the country.

So, yeah…change is being forced upon me.

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5 reasons to keep your writer’s resume shiny and handy

Hire this writer for she (or he) is awesome.I’m a stickler when it comes to my writer’s resume. Even though I’m happy where I am, I’m still putting it through some regular maintenance. As I research new ideas and trends, I’m noticing that some people think writers don’t need a resume.

Main reasons being no one reads them anymore, they’re boring and that your online portfolio more effectively shows you at your best. The strongest case I’ve come across for not having a resume is made by freelance B2B copywriter, Daisy McCarty, in her blog post Why You Should Burn Your Freelance Resume. To sum up her standpoint, by presenting a resume, you present yourself as a job seeker and put yourself in a weaker negotiating position.

All valid points.

I still think every copywriter — freelance and cube dwelling — should have a resume.

Now, not all writers market the same way. If you’re a blogger who networks online or a magazine writer who pitches ideas, a traditional resume may not be the best use of your time. My point of view is that of a professional copywriter who targets businesses.

I’ve freelanced and cube-dwelled. And in both cases, the benefits of having one outweighed my reasons for not.

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Truths revealed by walking in a prospect’s shoes

stay-calm-and-assemble-the-minionsAssemble the minions!
— Gru,
Despicable Me (2010, Universal Pictures)

 

Most of us know what it’s like to be the freelancer trying to get the gig. But how often do we get to see what it’s like on the flip side of the coin? To be the one hiring creative talent?

I’m not talking about hiring other writers or designers to help with your own clients. I’m talking about inbound prospects who only know that they have a problem, that you might be a solution and not much else.

A lot of freelancers give these prospects the brush off because “time is money” and “I only want to work with people who already know my value” and all that. Instead, these prospects could be opportunity knocking.

It just takes a little empathy.
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