Writing Prompt Friday (comfort)

Rubber Ducky Copywriter - Writing Prompt Friday

Hello and welcome back to Writing Prompt FridayI’d like to take a moment to say “Thank you.” Really, thank you. I’ve been posting writing prompts regularly and you still keep coming back for them. Many of you even “Like” them. And I appreciate it. I appreciate you. I started posting prompts as a way to stay engaged with my blog even when life gets in the way of writing long posts. That you keep liking them and enjoying them have helped me keep it up. For that, I thank you. Any audience is a privilege and not to be taken for granted. Thank you for coming to visit.

Now, on to this week’s prompt…

Life had become so comfortable, it hurt.

Want to share your writing prompt result? Share in the comments.
Yours, Ducky

The truth about feedback

Disney Feedback.png

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that when one hears the word “feedback,” one thinks “criticism.” The face twists in a cringe, and one wants nothing more than to run fast, run far and insert one’s head into a hole in the ground.

Feedback is uncomfortable.

Getting feedback on our work is one thing. That kind of feedback comes with the territory; we expect it and usually take it objectively because it’s about our work, not us. But getting feedback on our professional or personal performance? Yikes.

So let’s shed some light on what feedback really is: a gift. Continue reading

Staying social when writing is solitary

Ducks in a Row

Writing itself is solitary. Even if we’re working in an office and surrounded by people, we typically tuck ourselves away, apply our headphones and scurry into our documents with the enthusiasm of a meerkat digging a new downstairs.

Let the others collaborate; I have word magic to conjure.

It’s not that we dislike people (generally speaking). It’s that writing happens in our head. But that creates a problem.

Writing is solitary, but humans are social (even introverted ones like me; don’t tell). We fill our creative wells in countless ways, but one of those needs to be socializing despite the inherently solitary nature of our work.

Socializing keeps us:

  • empathetic
  • in touch with other perspectives
  • connected with other ideas
  • up-to-date with trends and techniques

It’s important, but it’s counter to what we do. So, what do we do? Continue reading

5 keys to taking feedback like a badass

Gandalf and Saruman

No one likes to work with someone who refuses to take feedback. We’ve all worked with people like that—someone who’s determined that he/she is right and that others are wrong and that the work produced is without flaw or need of improvement at all, whatsoever. Period.

It’s not easy.

There was a period of two years during which I worked with two graphic designers who are absolute opposites when it comes to handling critique of their work.

Note: When I refer to these creative colleagues, I’m obviously not going to use their real names. So I’ll call them Gandalf and Saruman. Personal preference.

Watching them showed me their distinct approaches—and how to be better at taking feedback myself.

Continue reading

Why I’m not participating in NaNoWriMo—again

lolcat-spartans

Let me start by making something clear—in no way am I against National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) itself. As with any gargantuan goal, I see  value in it.

Setting goals. Applying butt to chair and getting the job done. Pushing yourself to finish. Building your writing muscles. The feeling of accomplishment at just having the novel written. The bragging rights alone can give you warm fuzzy feelings.

However, NaNoWriMo isn’t for everyone.

  • If doing NaNoWriMo doesn’t work for you, don’t do it.
  • There are reasons to do it and reasons not to do it.
  • Either way is fine.

NaNoWriMo is not for me.

Here’s why. Continue reading