Being thankful this Thanksgiving

thankyou

Sometimes it’s hard to be thankful. For millions of us (myself included), these past few weeks have been one of those times. Adding to some other upheaval that’s been going on in my life for the past seven months, I’ve had days I just wanted to curl up with my teddy bear and not come out from under the covers for the rest of the week.

(Seriously, what’s up, Universe? Do you need a hug? Or a vacation?)

But instead of writing a political post or a personal post, I’m going to put some gratitude back out into the universe.

Because I think we can all use a little goodness right now. Continue reading

Why I’m not participating in NaNoWriMo—again

lolcat-spartans

Let me start by making something clear—in no way am I against National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) itself. As with any gargantuan goal, I see  value in it.

Setting goals. Applying butt to chair and getting the job done. Pushing yourself to finish. Building your writing muscles. The feeling of accomplishment at just having the novel written. The bragging rights alone can give you warm fuzzy feelings.

However, NaNoWriMo isn’t for everyone.

  • If doing NaNoWriMo doesn’t work for you, don’t do it.
  • There are reasons to do it and reasons not to do it.
  • Either way is fine.

NaNoWriMo is not for me.

Here’s why. Continue reading

Let’s get ready to write—it’s National Novel Writing Month

NaNoWriMo CrestIt’s that time of year again—National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). Otherwise known as National Write Your @$$ Off Month. Now, if you’ve followed Rubber Ducky Copywriter for a while (thank you!), you know I’m a cheerleader. If you haven’t, please know I’m a cheerleader.

Your cheerleader.

I want you to do well. Write lots. Follow your dreams. All that good stuff.

That means a (hopefully) handy-dandy list of resources for those of you willing, capable and brave enough to pound out a 50,000-word novel in 30 days.

Continue reading

Flex your skills with 5-minute free writing

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Once upon a time, in a faraway land called Houston, I was an art student. Then I became a graphic artist and web designer. I sketched, a lot.

Now I’m a copywriter who works alongside graphic artists and web designers. And they sketch, a lot. During meetings, in brainstorming sessions, at their desks — their pens and pencils skim over whatever’s handy with a steady rhythm. And in just a few minutes, they can sketch some amazing stuff.

Last week, I was five minutes early for a meeting. So I followed their example but instead of sketching pictures, I jotted down random phrases that popped in my head.

The results themselves were terrible, but it was still worth it.

Continue reading

To edit or not to edit?

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“Please don’t judge my spelling, I know you’re a writer.”

“I’m sorry for my sloppy email, I know you’re a writer.”

“I apologize in advance for my crappy IM, I know you’re a writer.”

– Lots of people

I hear these fearful phrases (and similar) more often than I’d like, usually from people who are about to put something in writing for me to read.

Colleagues, new friends, old friends, casual acquaintances, passersby on the Internet—you name it, too many people are afraid I’m going to point out their mistakes just because I’m a writer.

But I’m not.

I’m not a member of the grammar police. And I don’t know a writer who is. Yes, we’re sticklers and yes, we do enjoy a good Oxford comma debate. But I’d like to think enough of us know when to turn it off.

But it does make me want to ask—when is it okay to edit and when is it not?

Continue reading