5 ways to keep your creative well topped off

Empty Inside LolCatIt happens to every writer. Every so often, we hit a dry spell. One minute we’re bursting with clever copy and witty word banter. The next minute, we’re trying to remember the difference between “write” and “right.”

Kristen Lamb, author of #1 best-selling books We Are Not Alone—The Writer’s Guide to Social Media and Are You There, Blog? It’s Me, Writer, recently posted on her blog:

“We must fill our creative well before we write,
or we have nothing to draw from.”
– Kristen Lamb,
The First & Most Crucial Step to OWNING NaNoWriMo

Although her post focuses on fiction writers gearing up for National Write Your Ass Off month (also known as November), she makes a good point about writers’ creativity in general: we need to keep refilling our creative wells or they’ll run dry.

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What writers’ dreams are made of…?

Original image courtesy of MFer Photography, via Flickr Commons

Image courtesy of MFer Photography, via Flickr Commons

I like to write helpful posts. Information, discoveries, inspiration, resources—things that’ll help you do whatever it is you’re trying to do.

This probably isn’t one of those posts.

But it still might brighten your general outlook. So here we go…

A writer’s brain likes to entertain itself, especially when it’s had a sleep aid.

Last night, I dreamt that I was on a sail boat packed bow to stern with other contractor creatives, mostly copywriters and designers. The skies were charcoal grey. The seas were stormy. Wave after wave dumped water on our heads (I was on deck). We all wore argyle sweaters.

Whoever was at the helm took us to a deserted island and unloaded us onto shore, still wearing our argyle sweaters.

One by one, we had to stand in a wooden outhouse from the Wild West; complete with moon silhouette on the door.

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4 ways to write your way out of writer’s block, fast

Bust Writer's Block

Having writer’s block and a looming deadline can zap your creative juices faster than a cat can claw you for rubbing its belly.

There’s always typing with your eyes closed but sometimes —such as when your brain is stressed — closing your eyes just gives your brain time to invent horrors that will befall you should you fail.

Most often, when you’re blocked, it’s not because you can’t find any words; it’s because you can’t settle on the right words. You expect perfection the first time out.

Add to that being under the proverbial gun to produce, and you’ve got pressure.

So much pressure.

Sometimes you thrive. Other times, you need an escape route.

Give yourself something to edit.

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Does your work space work?

Happiness is neither virtue nor pleasure,
not this thing nor that, but simply growth.
– W.B. Yeats

RubberDuckysKeyboardWhen was the last time you audited your environment?

Never mind all those articles you’ve read about creating an effective creative space. We’re writers; one size never fits all. It’s part of our charm; we’re quirky.

To figure out whether or not you need to update your workspace, you only need to ask yourself how well do your surroundings bring out the best in you?

Are you surrounded with items that inspire you or help you produce?

Or are you just used to having them there?

As I’ve made room for wedding gifts and honeymoon souvenirs, it’s occurred to me that I have a lot of stuff that doesn’t bring me joy anymore; it’s just there. I don’t even think about them anymore. Sound familiar?

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Why not guarantee the results of your copywriting?

Success Can Lead to FailLately I’ve noticed websites by “results guaranteed copywriters.”

These are copywriters who promise increased sales, higher conversion rates or what-have-you, or they’ll give their clients their money back.

Why would a freelance copywriter do this?

To win trust. Prospects who contact you are taking a risk that the service you provide won’t work. By offering a money-back-guarantee, you take away their fear. If they don’t get the results they were promised, they’ve lost nothing but time.

To bring in more prospects. People are more likely to pick up the phone if they feel like they can’t lose. Like with an infomercial. Which means a higher number of inbound prospects.

Does it work?

I’m not rude brave enough to call any of these copywriters and ask for their financials. Or details about their projects—their niche and target audience might be ideal for making such a promise.

Since they’re in business, I’m going to assume that this business model works for them.

But here’s why I won’t guarantee results.

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